Beeswax Uses: From Candles to Cosmetics and Squeaky Doors

Beeswax Uses - Bee Wilde Bee & Honey Farm

Beeswax Uses: From Candles to Cosmetics and Squeaky Doors

With a little thought, you will quickly realize that beeswax uses are not limited to sealing a letter in a movie scene depicting the middle ages, or to candles in that same movie – and today. Not even close. Over the centuries, mankind has figured out a lot of ways to put this natural material to work around the house, in cooking, in skin care and beauty products, in healthcare, in craft work and art, just to name a few. It’s even used as a figure of speech, “mind your own beeswax!”

The following list and accompanying brief descriptions of beeswax uses includes many that have evolved over time. While this list compares well to others, we do not wish to give the impression that this is a complete accounting of all beeswax uses. Some of these beeswax uses continue as they were first conceived (whenever that was), others have evolved as the properties of beeswax have become further examined and better understood.

Beeswax Candles

Pure beeswax candles have been the choice for candles through the ages, making it one of the earliest beeswax uses. Beeswax was what the first candles were made from, and what the best are made from even today. Beeswax is 100% natural and a renewable resource. Beeswax is naturally aromatic, infused with the sweet, subtle scent of honey. Being nontoxic and non-allergenic, beeswax candles burn clean and soot free. While burning, they release negative ions, just as seashores or rain and lightning storms do. These negative ions improve air quality by eliminating pollutants and allergens from the air that we breathe. Beeswax candles actually clean the air.

Beeswax candles provide the ultimate in candlelight due to a high melting and burning temperature that translates into exceptionally long burn times. They burn with a steady, healthy sized flame that radiates a spectrum of light that matches the sun. Beeswax candles are the ultimate in natural luxury!

Beeswax Lip Balm

Beeswax is anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and an anti-oxidant. This means that it can heal wounds, including cracked and swollen lips. Beeswax is also an incredible moisturizer and is an excellent emulsifier (allowing it to lock in moisture), so that it can soothe any pain caused by dryness and dehydration. Additionally, this capacity of beeswax to lock in that moisture also makes your lips supple and soft, something you can only achieve after constant and deep hydration, not just surface attention. Lastly, beeswax contains Vitamin A, which must be present for cells to develop normally, providing the needed properties to allow it to protect your lips from further danger. Beeswax forms a protective layer on the lips that can shield them from harmful UV rays, as well as preventing infections and possible cold sores.

Bee Wilde Bee & Honey Farm offers its own Beeswax Lip Balm goes on smooth and silky, the natural benefits of beeswax enhance with the oils and ingredients of Sweet Almond Oil, coconut oil, Bee Wilde Beeswax, Avacado Oil, and Cocoa Butter. Shea Butter, flavor oil or essential oils may be added for individual beeswax lip balm flavors that are offered.

Skin Moisturizer

Beeswax is an amazing way to moisturize the skin and is commonly found in skin care products and cosmetics. It can help protect and repair rough, dry or chapped skin because it has the ability to lock in moisture. Beeswax helps to thicken homemade cosmetics and lotions because it is solid at room temperature and has a relatively high melting point of 147 degrees Fahrenheit. This is especially helpful in recipes that include high amounts of coconut oil, which has a low melting point, or other oils that are liquid at room temperature.

Lock in your skin’s natural moisture with beeswax, and add the antioxidant vitamin E to help protect and repair rough, dry, or chapped skin. Melt 4 ounces of sweet organic almond oil and 1 ounce of beeswax in a double boiler. Remove from the heat, add 2 ounces of distilled water, and stir well. Add 10 drops of vitamin E oil and 10 drops of lavender essential oil, and stir continuously until the mixture has cooled. Pour into individual tins for use.

Itch Relief

Make a salve that works for poison ivy, poison oak, and other itch or irritations from bug bites, bee stings and rashes. In a small saucepan, simmer 1 tablespoon of chickweed powder, 1 tablespoon of comfrey power, and 1 pint of organic olive oil for 3 hours. Strain, add 2 ounces of beeswax, and pour into individual tins for use.

Pain Relief

Beeswax can make an effective salve for aches and pains. In a small saucepan, simmer 1 tablespoon chickweed powder, 1 tablespoon wormwood powder, and 2 pints of sweet olive oil for 3 hours. Strain, add 3 ounces of beeswax and 10 drops of tea tree oil, and pour into individual tins.

Furniture Polish

You can make your own beeswax furniture polish by mixing equal parts beeswax to linseed oil and mineral spirits.

Wood Treatment

Combine a food grade mineral oil with melted beeswax to condition wood bowls and butcher blocks. Use about 40% beeswax to about 60% food grade mineral oil. If the consistency of the paste is not right for your application, you can reheat the mixture and add more mineral oil.

Waterproofing

Rub beeswax over leather shoes and other leather products to help protect against all types of weathering including water. Put beeswax on matches to help keep them dry if you are out fishing, boating or skiing, or wherever there is a risk of their getting wet.

Preserve Sewing or Craft Thread

Run your thread along a block (or piece) of beeswax a couple times and it will help prevent it from tangling, allows the thread to run through fabric easier, and adds to the life of the thread. Bead-crafters commonly use beeswax for this purpose. Thread with beeswax coating can be squeezed at the end, making it much easier to thread beading needles with tiny ‘eyes’.

As a Lubricant around the Home

Do you have a sliding glass door, window sill or drawer that does not move freely? Just rub some beeswax on the rails to get things moving. You can also rub beeswax on nails or screws to help them move easier, and on zippers if they are stuck.

Encaustic Painting with Beeswax (Hot Wax Painting

Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually prepared wood, though canvas and other materials are often used. The simplest encaustic mixture can be made from adding pigments to the heated beeswax, but there are several other recipes that can be used—some containing other types of waxes, damar resin, linseed oil, or other ingredients. Pure, powdered pigments can be used, though some mixtures use oil paints or other forms of pigment./p>

Metal tools and special brushes can be used to shape the paint before it cools, or heated metal tools can be used to manipulate the wax once it has cooled onto the surface. Today, tools such as heat lamps, heat guns, and other methods of applying heat allow artists to extend the amount of time they have to work with the material. Because beeswax is used as the pigment binder, encaustics can be sculpted as well as painted for added texture. Other materials can be encased or collaged into the surface, or layered, using the encaustic medium to stick them to the surface.

Encaustic Painting with Beeswax (Hot Wax Painting

Another of the early beeswax uses is Encaustic painting, also known as hot wax painting, involves using heated beeswax to which colored pigments are added. The liquid or paste is then applied to a surface—usually prepared wood, though canvas and other materials are often used. The simplest encaustic mixture can be made from adding pigments to the heated beeswax, but there are several other recipes that can be used—some containing other types of waxes, damar resin, linseed oil, or other ingredients. Pure, powdered pigments can be used, though some mixtures use oil paints or other forms of pigment./p>

Metal tools and special brushes can be used to shape the paint before it cools, or heated metal tools can be used to manipulate the wax once it has cooled onto the surface. Today, tools such as heat lamps, heat guns, and other methods of applying heat allow artists to extend the amount of time they have to work with the material. Because beeswax is used as the pigment binder, encaustics can be sculpted as well as painted for added texture. Other materials can be encased or collaged into the surface, or layered, using the encaustic medium to stick them to the surface.

About Bee Wilde’s Honey “Bee Uses” Article

If you something in our Beeswax Use article that you think is incorrect or incomplete – or there is a use that we should add, please contact us by email with that information.

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